Episode 94: Peanuts and Peanut Butter

Monday, May 21, 2018
We delve into peanuts, how it's harvested and see how George Washington Carver contributed to its popularity in the United States. Then we talk all about peanut butter, who invented it, and popular brands and how to make your own these days. Also, we help our Food Fight listener with her child's upcoming 1st birthday and all the sugars.

Let's taco 'bout it!



Disclosure: Some of the links within these show notes are affiliate links, which means that if you choose to make a purchase, we will earn a commission, which helps support our show. This commission comes at no additional cost to you, our wonderful listener!

Let's taco 'bout it!

  • What changes do you want to see at Episode 100? Send us an email to hungrysquared@gmail.com. It's coming up soon!
  • Sharon had a Smashmallow gourmet marshmallow in the Mint Chocolate Chip flavor. The Cookie Dough and Cinnamon Churro flavors are next up on the list to try. Goodness, they come in this, this, this flavor that I want to try now!
  • Winter LOVES Dang Coconut Chips, the plain kind, though there are this, this, and this flavor.
  • Peanut butter jelly time peanut butter jelly time! Peanut butter jelly with a baseball bat. (Winter has seen this video, but never watched it to the end.)



  • Peanuts are a legume and considered an oil crop, and it was a hybrid from 2 wild species of peanuts. They've been around for a long time with pottery shaped like a peanut.
  • George Washington Carver is a scientist and a botanist from Missouri. He was born to a slave family, but wasn't raised by his parents, but rather his slave family.
  • Booker T. Washington invited Carver to be the head of agriculture at Tuskeegee, but there was such a shortage 
  • Carver created a bulletin with 105 ways to prepare and eat the peanut and the peanut was on the map.
  • How are peanuts harvested: the entire plant is pulled from the ground, turned upside down and allowed to dry out to prevent a mold from growing.





  • Alton Brown makes his own peanut butter and here's his recipe.
  • Mr. Peanut has been around since 1916. A 16-year old boy Antonio Gentile submitted a design of a anthropomorphic peanut to a contest only to received $5 as a prize. Andrew Wallich added the monocle, top hat and cane. Amedeo Obici befriended Gentile and paid his and his siblings' ways through college.
  • Our Food Fight listener asked about giving sugar to their child at her first birthday. It's okay to not do a smash cake--it's your kid! You don't have to do all the Pinterest things. By the way, little kids shouldn't have honey before 1 year of age!

Run Time: 47 minutes

Sponsors: We have no sponsors for this episode. If you're interested in working with us, please contact us. We'd love to partner with you.

Episode 93: Fry Sauce, Golf Sauce, Pink Sauce, and....MayoChup Minisode

Monday, May 14, 2018
If you haven't heard, Heinz's MayoChup is getting a rise out of a lot of people. On this week's mini-episode, we tackle the brief, but important history of the condiment fry sauce in the United States and how as Utahns, we claim and protect it. We also talk about how other countries couldn't resist mixing up mayonnaise and ketchup together.

Let's taco 'bout it!


Disclosure: Some of the links within these show notes are affiliate links, which means that if you choose to make a purchase, we will earn a commission, which helps support our show. This commission comes at no additional cost to you, our wonderful listener!

Let's taco 'bout it!

  • Sharon talked about how she tried and loved Utah's Red Iguana's vegetable mole during Everything Food Conference this week.
  • Winter talked about how Katie Weinner of SLCPop and of Top Chef fame showed us how to make loads of browned butter bits using powdered milk and butter. She learned this from the folks at Momofuku
  • Why are we talking fry sauce? Because our two friends from Orlando, Lisa Wilk of the blog Taste Cook Sip and Anna-Marie Walsh of Beauty and the Beets, experienced fry sauce while traveling Utah this week.


  • Have you seen the hullabaloo on Twitter regarding MayoChup? It's pretty funny!
  • Don Carlos Edwards of Utah has been said to have created the ketchup-mayonnaise combination to create fry sauce. He went on to open up the fast-food chain Arctic Circle, where you can order and buy fry sauce.
  • In other countries, you can find a version of fry sauce, including chemist Luis Federico Luloir's golf sauce or salsa golf, which he created while lunching at a golf course in Argentina.
  • Who likes fry sauce? Write in at hungrysquared@gmail.com!



Run Time: 23 minutes

Sponsors: We have no sponsors for this episode. If you're interested in working with us, please contact us. We'd love to partner with you.

Episode 92: Berries (and Other Fruits That Aren't Technically Berries)

Monday, May 7, 2018
Since they're in season, we decided to talk all about berries. Then we discovered, some of the berries that we thought were berries, aren't technically berries. We talk about strawberries, blueberries, raspberries, blackberries, and cranberries. Winter then touched briefly on the berry atropa belladonna, which is from the deadly nightshade family. We then talk about how the Instant Pot is just another cooking method during our Food Fight segment.

Let's taco 'bout it!



Disclosure: Some of the links within these show notes are affiliate links, which means that if you choose to make a purchase, we will earn a commission, which helps support our show. This commission comes at no additional cost to you, our wonderful listener!

Let's taco 'bout it!

  • Sharon introduced the Eggroll-in-a-Bowl recipe for dinner this week and it was a hit! Here's the recipe she used. This recipe used a shortcut by getting coleslaw mix, but it wasn't available (maybe due to the E.coli breakout in 25 states). By the way, it can be keto-diet friendly if you don't eat it with rice. Sharon didn't eat it with rice, since she's looking forward to getting married this fall (surprise!) and fitting into a wedding dress. They also used coconut aminos, because Sharon is allergic to soy.
  • Winter's sister Jules (aka @girlwiththepassporttattoo) made a Utah Jazz team-inspired pizza cookie (which you can see on the Hungry Squared Instagram page) to cheer on our Utah Jazz in their Western Conference playoff run. By the way, Winter's tired all the time, because she's growing a human who will likely be birthed late summer (surprise!).


  • Fun fact: Some berries are true berries, such as blueberries and cranberries, where there is a single flower and ovary from which the berry appears.
  • Cane berries are actually "composite" or "aggregate" fruit, but we call them berries, such as raspberries and blackberries. These cane berries have multiple ovaries from a single flower, so each drupelet is like a single tiny stone fruit. Strawberries is considered a false fruit, since the seeds are on the outside.
  • Other things that are technically berries because of the botanical definition: bananas, avocados, pumpkins, kiwis, tomatoes, and watermelons. Crazy, huh?
  • Blueberries are true berries and are typically grown on something called a high bush variety. They've only recently been domesticated in the 1920s.
  • When you bake blueberries with alkali ingredients, such as baking soda, because of the anthocyanin pigments, the alkaline environment will change the blueberries color to a greenish hue.
  • Initial inspiration for Velcro came from the entanglements of the hairs on the surface of raspberries.
  • Strawberries, blueberries, and raspberries are nice and low in calories.


  • According to the USDA, each person eats an average of close to 5 lbs of berries a year.
  • Sharon talked about the largest strawberry shortcake, according to the Guinness World Record, was made in 1999 in Plant City, Florida and was 827 square feet. However, in doing some more research it looks like that was outdone in 2014 in California and more recently in the Philippines. Who knew strawberry shortcake was a thing to get on the record books!
  • Blueberries freeze in just 4 minutes in the freezer.
  • Raspberries come in a variety of colors: red, gold, purple, or black. Did you know that?
  • The loganberry is a cross between a raspberry and a blackberry. A boysenberry is a cross between a raspberry, a blackberry, and a loganberry.


  • Raspberries were symbolic in Christian art. It was a symbol for kindness.
  • In Scotland, there was a special train that went form Scotland to London called the Raspberry Special, which would get loaded up with all the raspberries for the market.
  • Blackberries are relatives to raspberries, but the inner receptacle will come off with the blackberry. With raspberries, the inner receptacle stays on the bush.
  • Luther Burbank was integral in spreading the Himalayan Blackberry in the Puget Sound area of the Pacific Northwest area. Mr. Burbank rubbed shoulders with the likes of Thomas Edison and Henry Ford. He made such crazy things (didn't take off) such as the tomato-potato hybrid, but other things like the shasta daisy, freestone peaches, and the Burbank Russet potato, used in your local McDonald's today!
  • Cranberries were used by the Native Americans in pemmican. We talk about pemmican in this episode


  • How did cranberries get there name? Likely not from the shape of the flower of the cranberry, which looks like a crane, but rather from the Germanic language origins.
  • Ocean Spray was started when attorney Marcus Urann purchased a cranberry bog and decided to can cranberries in a jelly form.
  • The Sweetie variety of cranberry was bred to be sweeter, not requiring added sugar.
  • Atropa belladonna is a plant and berry, part of the deadly nightshade family. It has been used for cosmetic applications, medicine, and for deadly reasons (aka poison).
  • During our Food Fight segment, our listener asked about whether she should jump on the Instant Pot band wagon or not, since it seems like everyone own one. Winter, herself, loves the Instant Pot, but she acknowledges that the IP is another cooking method, just like Jason Logsdon said in his episode on sous vide. Wise words!

Run Time: 48 minutes

Sponsors: We have no sponsors for this episode. If you're interested in working with us, please contact us. We'd love to partner with you.

Episode 91: The Toaster and Toaster Breakfast Foods (aka Pop-Tarts, Eggo Waffles, and Toaster Strudels)

Monday, April 30, 2018
We love the toaster and all the things you can toast in it, including all Eggo Waffles, Pop-Tarts, and Toaster Strudels. We get into the toaster, the next best thing since sliced bread, then go into the interesting and competitive history and design of the Eggo Waffles (aka the Froffle), Pop-Tarts, Country Squares, and Toaster Strudels.

Let's taco 'bout it!



Disclosure: Some of the links within these show notes are affiliate links, which means that if you choose to make a purchase, we will earn a commission, which helps support our show. This commission comes at no additional cost to you, our wonderful listener!

Let's taco 'bout it!



  • There were toasting tools (that resemble current camping-type toasters) that were used before toasters were invented to achieve bread toastiness.
  • The Scottish scientist and inventor Alan MacMasters invented the first electric toaster in 1893. There were a couple of major drawbacks to his version: the heating element would melt, creating a fire hazard and electricity wasn't readily available to everyone at that time.
  • Engineer Albert Marsh created a new heating element, an alloy of nickel and chromium, which he named Nichrome. (You can buy rolls of this type of heating element still today.) George Schneider collaborated with Albert Marsh to apply for the first patent in the US for the electric toaster.


  • Lloyd G. Copeman and his wife Hazel Copeman introduced the automatic bread turner in 1913. Game changer! Unless you want to only toast one side of your bread (like a bagel toaster).
  • In 1921, Charles Strite patented the first automatic pop-up toaster (aka it had a timer built in). It was tweaked even further to have the timer, heating elements on both sides, and the automatic pop-up feature. We've arrived!
  • Nowadays, the "Cancel" button, the browning settings, the "Frozen" button, the removable crumb tray, longer and deeper bread slots, are all common design features on the modern-day toaster.
  • Fancy toasters: Internet toasters, toast with the weather prediction on one side of your toast, and the hot dog toaster. (By the way, have you seen this video with Stephen Colbert and the "Notorious RBG" about whether a hot dog is a sandwich? Hilarious!)



  • The person who invented sliced bread, Otto Frederick Rohwedder, is a hero in my book. Greatest thing since sliced bread!
  • The Eggo food company, started by 3 brothers Anthony, Frank, and Sam Dorsa, created mayonnaise made with fresh ranch eggs, hence the name Eggo.
  • They then went on to make waffle mix, potato chips, then eventually "Froffles" (a portmanteau of frozen and waffles). People kept calling them Eggos because of the egg flavor and it stuck. 
  • Kellogg took over the Eggo company in the 1970s, and the "L'eggo My Eggo" ad campaign started in 1972 and still is going (after a short retirement). By the way, Frank Dorsa never got to see the frozen pancake before he passed away in the 90s, but Kellogg finally got it done!
  • Pop Tarts started due to a press conference by Post, a competitor of Kellogg, where they announced a toaster breakfast food, called Country Squares. However, Kellogg beat them to the punch and introduced Pop-Tarts before Post could get the Country Squares out.


  • We tried the Oreo and Strawberry flavors of Pop-tarts as as experience. Winter prefers them toasted (of course), while Sharon prefers them raw.
  • It was too expensive to wrap Pop-tarts individually, so they foil wrapped them 2 within a package.
  • Now Pillsbury's Toaster Strudel came out in 1985 with their slogan "Something better just popped up".
  • We talked about bagels on another episode--have you heard it?
  • During our Food Fight segment, we talk about a roommate stealing the listener's food. We decide

Run Time: 56 minutes

Sponsors: We have no sponsors for this episode. If you're interested in working with us, please contact us. We'd love to partner with you.

Episode 90: Sous Vide with Jason Logsdon of Amazing Food Made Easy

Monday, April 23, 2018
We're talking to Jason Logsdon of Amazing Food Made Easy about the cooking technique sous vide. He gets into the why we'd want to cook with sous vide, basic (and easy) equipment and set-up, and the science behind the temperatures and times to cook food. If you haven't tried sous vide, you need to! You're in for a treat with this interview!

Let's taco' bout it!



Disclosure: Some of the links within these show notes are affiliate links, which means that if you choose to make a purchase, we will earn a commission, which helps support our show. This commission comes at no additional cost to you, our wonderful listener!

Let's taco 'bout it!



  • We're excited to have our friend Jason Logsdon of AmazingFoodMadeEasy.com and SelfPublishACookbook.com, on the podcast again today. We met Jason at the Everything Food Conference and he ended up being our very first guest on the podcast when we chatted with him about Infusions (listen to it here) and look forward to learning all about sous vide from him.
  • Thanks to listener Keyra for requesting this topic with these enthusiastic words in her email: "Holy crap! You guys need to talk about cooking stuff in a sous-vide!!!!!!!!!! I just ate a trip tip for a work Christmas party that tastes like prime rib!!!! People need to know!" Thanks, Keyra.!
  • Jason has already published 4 books on sous vide (this, this, this, and this), so he knows his stuff.
  • Chef Thomas Keller of the restaurant French Laundry made the technique popular with his book Under Pressure: Cooking Sous Vide.
  • Panera is also using sous vide to cook their chicken and prepared meats. 
  • The basics: What is sous vide? Jason has a great article here.
  • What is happening at different temperatures? At 125-130 degrees F, you're killing off the bacteria; at 140 degrees F, more juice is coming out of it; and 150-160 degrees F different parts of the meat are being broken down. 


  • Chuck roast steaks at 36 hours can give you a ribeye like texture and flavor, for cheaper.
  • Heating food through (then you'll be finishing it off on the grill or stovetop): This will be dependent on how thick your meat is. Jason sells a timing ruler to have to measure your meat thickness.
  • Tenderize: For braising and roasting, you will want longer cook time.
  • Timing in sous vide: You have much longer leeway and doesn't get ruined quickly. Yay!
  • Sous vide circulators: Heats the water and holds the temperature indefinitely.
  • What kind of containers can you sous vide in? You can use your regular stock pot, plastic container (like this 12 qt polycarbonate restaurant prep container), heck, even your own sink! Most of these containers with a sous vide machine can be placed on the counter, unless you start getting into vegetables. Those temps are closer to 185 degrees F and that is hot to the touch. Don't forget to put a trivet down!
  • Put your food and meat into food safety plastic bags before going into sous vide bath. You can use Food Saver bags or if you're a beginner, Ziploc Freezer bags work great also.
  • Use the water displacement method to shove all the air out of the food bag.
  • Another Captain Obvious tip: use a wooden spoon to push your food into the water for hotter temperatures, so you don't burn yourself!
  • Feel free to use different types of spices, rubs, seasonings, and herbs to flavor your meat. However, Jason suggests staying away from a few things, namely raw garlic, ginger, and onion, since they never get "cooked" and you don't get those caramelized, nutty, mellower flavors.



Joule Stick Circulator Sous Vide


Hamilton Beach Water Bath Sous Vide



Run Time: 54 minutes

Sponsors: We have no sponsors for this episode. If you're interested in working with us, please contact us. We'd love to partner with you.

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