Episode 98: Easy Culinary Science for Better Cooking with Author Jessica Gavin, Culinary Scientist

Monday, June 18, 2018
We are delighted to interview Jessica Gavin, culinary scientist and author of the new cookbook Easy Culinary Science for Better Cooking, all about some basic science principles that can elevate your home cooking. We go over dry and moist heat methods, the Maillard reaction, braising and stewing, emulsification, thickening methods and different baking mixing methods. Plus, we have a giveaway of her cookbook, so join us on the Hungry Squared Podcast's Facebook and Instagram pages.

Let's taco 'bout it!



Disclosure: Some of the links within these show notes are affiliate links, which means that if you choose to make a purchase, we will earn a commission, which helps support our show. This commission comes at no additional cost to you, our wonderful listener!

Let's taco 'bout it!



  • Jessica's grandfathers were rival chefs at the same Chinese restaurant in the Bay area, but their kids ended up falling in love and getting married. Food has always been a part of family DNA. Dessert Circus and Yan Can Cook were a huge part of why she wanted to go to culinary school.
  • Thankfully she heard about culinary science from a relative and was hooked on how the arts and the science was combined in cooking.

Photo courtesy of Jessica Gavin


Photo courtesy of Jessica Gavin

  • Moist heat cooking is using water and its different states. Vegetables when steamed quickly, the cell walls become more translucent and the chlorophyll shimmers through more. When you blanch it, that will stop the reaction and keep your veggies brighter in color.
  • Braising and stewing is all about low and slow, where connective tissue is broken down and converted into gelatin. If you go long enough, the gelatin will eventually be reabsorbed and add to flavor and texture and juiciness. Using a Dutch oven or cast iron is the best for braising and stewing.
  • The difference between the settings of High and Low on a slow cooker, is all about how quickly the slow cooker gets up to max temperature, NOT about the temperature. (Mind blown!)
  • Emulsification is all about bringing two things that don't want to be brought together (making a mixture uniform). Weak emulsifying agents (honey or mustard) or stronger ones (lecithin in the form of egg yolks) can be used to bring those things together. Quick tip: Add a teaspoon of mayonnaise in your vinaigrette, it will keep your dressing stable longer.
  • Sauces are so elusive and can "break". You need to ensure the fat is coating your starch particles. Remember, it should be 1:1 fat to starch by WEIGHT!

Photo courtesy of Jessica Gavin


Run Time: 61 minutes

Sponsors: We have no sponsors for this episode. If you're interested in working with us, please contact us. We'd love to partner with you.

Episode 97: Milkshakes and Malts

Monday, June 11, 2018
Upon request from a listener, we talk about the long and delicious history of the milkshake and malteds and how they changed from a boozy egg-based drink to the ice cream-based treat we know today. We also delve into malteds and how a new and improved malt product was introduced by the Horlick brothers. We also finish up by helping our Food Fight listener get around a questionable restaurant his/her in-laws love.

Let's taco 'bout it!



Disclosure: Some of the links within these show notes are affiliate links, which means that if you choose to make a purchase, we will earn a commission, which helps support our show. This commission comes at no additional cost to you, our wonderful listener!

Let's taco 'bout it!



  • The Behind the Beer blog talked about how the Coors and Miller Companies survived during the prohibition era. 
  • Hamilton Beach came on the scene and changed how milkshakes were made.
  • Earl Prince Sr. invented the multi-mixer, a five-spindled machine, so it could keep up with the demand of the milkshakes and malts that needed to be made.
  • Salesman Ray Kroc was impressed with the multi-mixer, and sold these mixers around the country. One restaurant, MacDonald's, had 8 multi-mixers for their shakes and also as a show piece within the restaurant. He ended up buying their name and opened up his first franchise in the 1950s all because of the multi-mixer!
  • Soda jerks are the person operating the soda fountain and they had their own lingo.
  • During our Food Fight segment, we help our listener with how to deal with his/her in-laws' favorite, yet sketchy, restaurant.

Run Time: 43 minutes

SponsorsOur podcast is brought to you today by our awesome and food-loving sponsor, IKEA.


Glad Midsommar!

Our second sponsor is the Draper Utah IKEA (67 West IKEA Way, Draper, Ut 84020). IKEA is having their special celebration: Swedish Midsummer Smorgasbord on June 15, 2018 with seatings at 4:00 pm and 6:30 pm. (We'll be at 6:30 pm seating in Draper with T-shirts to giveaway!).

There will be drinks, crayfish, desserts, and lots of traditional Swedish food. There will even be a kids activity, where you can dance and make a midsummer wreath. The dancing will help you work up an appetite for all that delicious Swedish food!

Ask a Restaurant co-worker for more details and to purchase your tickets. Seating is limited. IKEAFamily members get special pricing, so sign up in store or on the IKEA store app!

Episode 96: Olives

Monday, June 4, 2018
We finally cover olives and the long, long history of olives and olive trees throughout the world. We also go over how they are processed to pull off the very bitter taste from a compound called oleuropin. We finally help out our Food Fight listener with a nasty work break room. By the way, what's your favorite olive?

Let's taco 'bout it!


Photo courtesy of Benjamin Ashton

Disclosure: Some of the links within these show notes are affiliate links, which means that if you choose to make a purchase, we will earn a commission, which helps support our show. This commission comes at no additional cost to you, our wonderful listener!

Let's taco 'bout it!


Photo courtesy of James Carol Lee

  • This episode will be Part 1 about olives and olive oil. Look out for the episode on olive oil.
  • There are native, invasive, non-native, and naturalized plants. Olive trees are naturalized plants in so many parts of the world.
  • There is an olive tree in Brioni (Brijuni) still producing fruit, which is used for olive oil.
  • There are protected olive trees called Bidni in Malta and dated to be 2000 years old.
  • Greece is the #1 consumer of olive oil, while Spain is the #1 producer of olive oil.
  • The Spaniard Franciscans brought olive trees to the California coasts at these mission gardens.
  • Olives, unprocessed, are quite bitter because of the compound oleuropin. Though it's bitter, this compound oleuropin has many good properties, including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, according to this scientific article.
  • Olives can be processed many different ways: water-curing, brine-curing, salt-curing, lye-curing, and sun-curing.

Photo courtesy of Mariana Medvedeva


Run Time: 55 minutes

Sponsors: Our podcast is brought to you today by our awesome and food-loving sponsor, IKEA.

Glad Midsommar!

Our second sponsor is the Draper Utah IKEA (67 West IKEA Way, Draper, Ut 84020). IKEA is having their special celebration: Swedish Midsummer Smorgasbord on June 15, 2018 with seatings at 4:00 pm and 6:30 pm. (We'll be at 6:30 pm seating in Draper with T-shirts to giveaway!).

There will be drinks, crayfish, desserts, and lots of traditional Swedish food. There will even be a kids activity, where you can dance and make a midsummer wreath. The dancing will help you work up an appetite for all that delicious Swedish food!

Ask a Restaurant co-worker for more details and to purchase your tickets. Seating is limited. IKEAFamily members get special pricing, so sign up in store or on the IKEA store app!


Episode 95: Aluminum Foil, Parchment Paper, Wax Paper, and Saran Wrap

Tuesday, May 29, 2018
We are wrapping our food up in all the things that you find in that one drawer in your kitchen. We're talking about the history and science and design of aluminum foil, parchment paper, wax paper, and plastic wrap, specifically the Saran Wrap brand. You'll never look at those handy kitchen tools the same again.

Let's taco 'bout it!


Photo courtesy of Oscar Soderlund

Disclosure: Some of the links within these show notes are affiliate links, which means that if you choose to make a purchase, we will earn a commission, which helps support our show. This commission comes at no additional cost to you, our wonderful listener!

Let's taco 'bout it!




  • The company Tobler started to wrap their triangular-shaped chocolate Toblerone using the aluminum foil back in 1911. In the US, aluminum foil was used to wrap Lifesavers, candy bars and gum.
  • There is a shiny and a dull side of aluminum foil and a lot of people think it matters. It doesn't! It's a myth according to the Reynold's FAQ page, unless you are using the Non-Stick foil. The dull side has the non-stick properties, so put this toward the food.
  • There is a difference between parchment paper and wax paper. In a nutshell, parchment paper can have heat applied, while wax paper cannot have heat applied.
  • You can get Ruby Snap cookies frozen for later consumption!

Photo courtesy of Brooke Lark

  • Have you ever used the French cooking method en papillote? You can see how to do it here.
  • According to the American Cheese Society, wax paper is the preferred method for wrapping cheese.
  • Wax paper was used for centuries and it was made by coating paper with purified ear wax. That is SO gross! Have you seen this episode of Myth Busters? Ewww gross!
  • Why does Saran Wrap not stick as well? The original formula of Saran Wrap, also known as polyvinylidene chloride, was first discovered by the Dow Chemical Company by Ralph Wiley in 1933.
  • John Reilly (Ralph Wiley's boss) and Ralph developed the Saran Wrap product for food preservation in 1943.

Photo courtesy of Jason Leung


Run Time: 50 minutes

Sponsors: We have no sponsors for this episode. If you're interested in working with us, please contact us. We'd love to partner with you.

Episode 94: Peanuts and Peanut Butter

Monday, May 21, 2018
We delve into peanuts, how it's harvested and see how George Washington Carver contributed to its popularity in the United States. Then we talk all about peanut butter, who invented it, and popular brands and how to make your own these days. Also, we help our Food Fight listener with her child's upcoming 1st birthday and all the sugars.

Let's taco 'bout it!



Disclosure: Some of the links within these show notes are affiliate links, which means that if you choose to make a purchase, we will earn a commission, which helps support our show. This commission comes at no additional cost to you, our wonderful listener!

Let's taco 'bout it!

  • What changes do you want to see at Episode 100? Send us an email to hungrysquared@gmail.com. It's coming up soon!
  • Sharon had a Smashmallow gourmet marshmallow in the Mint Chocolate Chip flavor. The Cookie Dough and Cinnamon Churro flavors are next up on the list to try. Goodness, they come in this, this, this flavor that I want to try now!
  • Winter LOVES Dang Coconut Chips, the plain kind, though there are this, this, and this flavor.
  • Peanut butter jelly time peanut butter jelly time! Peanut butter jelly with a baseball bat. (Winter has seen this video, but never watched it to the end.)



  • Peanuts are a legume and considered an oil crop, and it was a hybrid from 2 wild species of peanuts. They've been around for a long time with pottery shaped like a peanut.
  • George Washington Carver is a scientist and a botanist from Missouri. He was born to a slave family, but wasn't raised by his parents, but rather his slave family.
  • Booker T. Washington invited Carver to be the head of agriculture at Tuskeegee, but there was such a shortage 
  • Carver created a bulletin with 105 ways to prepare and eat the peanut and the peanut was on the map.
  • How are peanuts harvested: the entire plant is pulled from the ground, turned upside down and allowed to dry out to prevent a mold from growing.





  • Alton Brown makes his own peanut butter and here's his recipe.
  • Mr. Peanut has been around since 1916. A 16-year old boy Antonio Gentile submitted a design of a anthropomorphic peanut to a contest only to received $5 as a prize. Andrew Wallich added the monocle, top hat and cane. Amedeo Obici befriended Gentile and paid his and his siblings' ways through college.
  • Our Food Fight listener asked about giving sugar to their child at her first birthday. It's okay to not do a smash cake--it's your kid! You don't have to do all the Pinterest things. By the way, little kids shouldn't have honey before 1 year of age!

Run Time: 47 minutes

Sponsors: We have no sponsors for this episode. If you're interested in working with us, please contact us. We'd love to partner with you.

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