Episode 40: Roux

Monday, April 17, 2017



Disclosure: Some of the links within these show notes are affiliate links, which means that if you choose to make a purchase, we will earn a commission, which helps support our show. This commission comes at no additional cost to you, our wonderful listener!

Let's taco 'bout it!

  • Sharon told about how We got to try some yummy olive oil and balsamic vinegar at the newly opened We Olive and Wine bar at Trolley Square in Salt Lake City. Winter Winter loved the asparagus dish (from this Martha Stewart recipe) that Lee made for a family dinner.
  • Thanks to Richard for the topic recommendation this week. 
  • What is roux? Flour and butter mixed together and used to thicken sauces and soups. It also adds flavor and color.
  • Instant roux packets are a thing--especially if you're making a gumbo or jumbalaya.
  • Sharon reports that browning your flour he
  • This is the easy mac and cheese recipe with the blonde roux that you can try by the Pioneer Woman.
  • Roux can go into the other French mother sauces: bechemal, veloute, and espagnole. 
  • Harold McGee reports an old recipe on a Wild Boars Head with Sauce--a black or yellow sauce. This was a pretty decent recipe considering its age as we discussed in our previous episode with Anna Curran on The History of Cookbooks. Boars Head Meat--is this the origin?
  • The science of roux: Starch (complex carbohydrate) + Fat (coating the starch granules) + Heat + Movement, leads to more  granules swelling with liquid, also known as gelatinization. 
  • Cornstarch vs wheat flour: does it make a difference? Yes! Cornstarch is pure starch. Wheat flour is starch AND protein (aka gluten). We talked about gluten in our first episode on pie!
  • The darker the roux, the more you will need to thicken your sauce, because of the shorter chains of complex carbohydrate. The blonder the roux, the less you will need--think bechemel.
  • There are some other thickeners for those who need a gluten free version: guar gums, arrowroot, proteins, potato starch, etc.
  • Our Food Fight listener is having environmental concerns with her friend always offering bottled water. What should she do?
  • Please subscribe to the podcast--and share it with a friend (it's easy)! Remember to send us a listeners email to hungrysquared@gmail.com--we'd love it!

Run Time: 35 minutes

Sponsors: Our sponsor for today's episode is Zip Schedules, an online employee scheduling software and app, for those small business owners. It makes making a schedule and communicating with your staff a cinch. It's ideal for those in the hospitality industry, like for our restaurant owners out there!

Go to zipschedules.com and get 30 days free. PLUS, our listeners can enter the code HUNGRY to receive 20% off each month for a whole year.

Thank you, Zip Schedules!
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Episode 39: Psychology of Menus with Special Guest, Ali Craig, Neuroemotional Brander

Monday, April 10, 2017



Disclosure: Some of the links within these show notes are affiliate links, which means that if you choose to make a purchase, we will earn a commission, which helps support our show. This commission comes at no additional cost to you, our wonderful listener!

Let's taco 'bout it!

  • Sharon made some delicious non-vegetarian chilaquiles for dinner this week, while Winter tried her hand at lemongrass bahn mi sandwiches. Her friend Morse Code the Vegan gave her the recipe for pickles carrots and daikon--yum!
  • Ali Craig is our special guest to talk about the psychology of menu design (requested by our listener Joanna). She and Winter had breakfast at Sherman's Deli in Palm Springs and had the best cinnamon rolls EVER!
  • Ali is a neuro-emotional brander, coach and consultant, speaker, and a best-selling author of 2 books (Hello, Job and Pushing to the Front), and one coming out this year (Cinderella Killed Your Sex Life), and mommy to 8 kitties.
  • Cheesecake Factory's menu is approachable, small and nimble, despite how long and obnoxious we may seem it is. While larger, more cumbersome menus are often found in higher end restaurants to make you feel like this is a special treat to be there.
  • We start talking about typography and the feet (serif vs sans serif). If there are feet on the writing, you think this brand is older and richer. If your typography is cleaner, then it's usually geared to a younger crowd.
  • Colors are found often in a lower end brand, while there are generally no colors in higher end restaurants due to what and how the eye sees in the demographics of the 40 and over crowd. 
  • Size of menu: The larger menu at higher end brands will make you self conscious, but also makes you feel special.
  • Description on menu items: Lower end restaurants are telling you the facts, so you can make a decision. Higher end restaurants are selling you a story with more flowerly language. 
  • Better than your granny's meatloaf: A memory is evoked and it makes you purchase that item. All these emotions flood into your body as you order and the food is brought to you.
  • Placement of certain food items: In the west, our eyes go to the right due to how we read and travel. Your eyes travel upper left, to mid-right, then back to bottom left. Also, it depends on what type of game they're trying to play: The expensive dummy items at the top of the menu can set you up to think the menu items below it are a good deal. The other game is to have the most expensive "sample platter" at the bottom, so you don't have to feel the pain of making a decision.
  • Human beings don't want to be in pain, so brands are trying to make sure their brand isn't causing you pain. This holds true with pricing on a menu. "No dollar amount" on a menu is meant to feel luxurious. "Whole number" pricing is a smaller visual footprint. The pricing where the pricing is a non-whole number (i.e. $9.95), the price looks more real and feels like you got a fair deal.
  • Freebies were a way to save money, and it's a way to make you feel like you got a good deal when you're taking something home in a to-go box, just like Olive Garden's Buy One, Take One Home deal. It feels like a wise investment!
  • Appetizers, small plates, or tapas, started in higher end restaurant, and has trickled down to lower end restaurants. Small plates makes you feel like you've been good and can order dessert.
  • Stylized food pictures matter and started in lower end restaurants where the literacy may be in question. It would makes those people feel more comfortable. If pictures are in a middle to higher end restaurant, the food may not look like the stylized photo and the customer may actually send it back.
  • The US is weight-obsessed, so the separate, small dessert menu works the best.
  • Sounds affect our food experience. For example, the Chili's sizzling fajita platter as it reminded Winter of this podcast episode by 99% Invisible. On the other hand, misophonia can be an issue in a restaurant.
  • Fun game: don't read the adjectives out of the menu item.
  • Ali is offering a fun Restaurant Cheat Sheet to our listeners at her website AliCraig.co.
  • We, or rather Sharon, helps someone on what is allowed in a garbage disposal during our Food Fight segment. Winter had to look up what was allowed per Angie's List.
Run Time: 1 hour 10 minutes

Sponsors: We have no sponsors for this episode. If you're interested in working with us, please contact us. We'd love to partner with you.

Episode 38: The History of Cookbooks with Special Guest, Anna Curran from Cookbook Create

Monday, April 3, 2017



Disclosure: Some of the links within these show notes are affiliate links, which means that if you choose to make a purchase, we will earn a commission, which helps support our show. This commission comes at no additional cost to you, our wonderful listener!

Let's taco 'bout it!


Run Time: 50 minutes

Sponsors: We have no sponsors for this episode. If you're interested in working with us, please contact us. We'd love to partner with you.

Episode 37: Ice Cream, Gelato, Custard, and Other Frozen Desserts

Monday, March 27, 2017



Disclosure: Some of the links within these show notes are affiliate links, which means that if you choose to make a purchase, we will earn a commission, which helps support our show. This commission comes at no additional cost to you, our wonderful listener!

Let's taco 'bout it!

  • Sharon has been infusing her own Irish Breakfast tea recently since she can't buy soda or other sugary drinks at work. Winter found Cara Cara navel orange and LOVED it!
  • Winter's fave ice cream is chocolate moosetracks (fudge ribbon with peanut butter cups) ice cream, while Sharon loves chocolate fudge brownie ice cream. What's your favorite ice cream?
  • Ice cream actually has quite a long history!
  • Ice is basically liquid and air (or overrun).
  • You can go to the FDA's website to get all the information about milk fat, egg yolk, and sugar percentages in frozen desserts. You'll see there are many differences between ice cream, custard, gelato, ice milk, sherbet, and sorbet. By the way, Sharon doesn't like the ice milk--it's disappointing.
  • Did you know that there are recommended serving temperatures, where ice cream is colder, while gelato and custard is served warmer?
  • Winter is a big fan of the gelato at Dolcetti Gelato--Pistachio and Sticky Rice & Mango are two yummy flavors.
  • This ice cream maker sounds awesome! How fun! There's the round ball method of making ice cream. Here are  couple of good ice cream makers: this, this, and this. And don't forget the ice cream salt if your ice making method requires it!
  • Rainier Creamery--you gotta open up during the winter!
  • Did you know that New England ice cream was started by Steve Herrell?
  • Sharon remembers a semifreddo-type dessert that her mom used to buy for guests.
  • Kulfi looks like it's worth the effort--when I'm in India, I'm gonna hunt one down.
  • Liquid nitrogen ice cream (like at Sub-Zero Ice Cream or Dippin' Dots) is fun, but it doesn't translate well to home consumption.
  • Akbar Mashti was an ice cream vendor in Iran and popularized ice cream, especially ice cream with salep (saalab). You can see what the ice cream looks like here and here (by the way, this ice cream can be found in many countries, such as Turkey).
  • We help a blended family decide on their dessert consumption frequency during our Food Fight segment. Let them eat cake! per Sharon.
  • Introduce the Hungry Squared podcast to your friends (#trypod) during the month of March! We'd love it!

Run Time: 50 minutes

Sponsors: We have no sponsors for this episode. If you're interested in working with us, please contact us. We'd love to partner with you.


Episode 36: From Idea to Grocery Shelf with Special Guest Sarah Jones of Miss Jones Baking Co.

Monday, March 20, 2017


From the Miss Jones Baking Co.

Disclosure: Some of the links within these show notes are affiliate links, which means that if you choose to make a purchase, we will earn a commission, which helps support our show. This commission comes at no additional cost to you, our wonderful listener!

Let's taco 'bout it!

"Sometimes you gotta hustle."

-Sarah Jones-


Run Time: 55 minutes

Sponsors: We have no sponsors for this episode. If you're interested in working with us, please contact us. We'd love to partner with you.


Episode 35: Bananas

Monday, March 13, 2017



Disclosure: Some of the links within these show notes are affiliate links, which means that if you choose to make a purchase, we will earn a commission, which helps support our show. This commission comes at no additional cost to you, our wonderful listener!

Let's taco 'bout it!

  • Despite a sad dry roast, the Yukon Gold + cream cheese + cream mashed potatoes that Sharon had were good for dinner and for breakfast the next day. Winter LOVES Garwood's Ginger Beer--it's nice and zingy!
  • Winter wanted to talk about bananas, because of the Reykjavik Half Marathon and how they DIDN'T have any bananas at the end of the race. 
  • Correction: Winter misspoke and the highest producer of bananas in Europe is actually France!
  • Bananas are clones! The Gros Michael, or the "Big Mike", was a popular banana at the start to mid-20th century.
  • The Panama Disease started to wipe out the "Big Mike", because they are genetically the same, so the Cavendish cultivar became the replacement.
  • The "Goldfinger" cultivar from Honduras is a possibility for the future, but definitely doesn't have the same Cavendish flavor.
  • Sharon mentions Christopher Kimball's Milk Street podcast episode with Ziggy Marley and how he ate green bananas as a kid.
  • By the way, the stainless steel soap (it's really a thing) that Sharon mentioned is this thing that takes away odors from your hands, especially sappiness from a plantain.
  • You can vacuum seal your fruit to prevent the oxidization of your fruit, but that's a little fancy for us--you can immerse your fruit in water and it will prevent the oxidization.
  • Super tasters may not like bananas because of the phenols + oxygen combine and may produce something bitter that super tasters detect.
  • Banana Runts candy--listen up Wonka!--don't taste like bananas! The flavor is not necessarily based on the Big Mike flavoring, it's just a compound--isoamyl acetate.
  • Our Food Fight listener was having some major spouse guilt about not making dinner.
  • Hey listeners, please share our podcast with your friends, especially since it's Podcast Awareness Month! #trypod

Run Time: 44 minutes

Sponsors: We have no sponsors for this episode. If you're interested in working with us, please contact us. We'd love to partner with you.


Episode 34: Vinegar and Balsamic Vinegar

Monday, March 6, 2017


Disclosure: Some of the links within these show notes are affiliate links, which means that if you choose to make a purchase, we will earn a commission, which helps support our show. This commission comes at no additional cost to you, our wonderful listener!

Let's taco 'bout it!

  • Sharon was pretty excited about the split pea soup that Lee made, and Winter tried snow cream at Shiro Kuma for the first time. Snow cream is kinda like the stuff they made in this book.  
  • Sharon doesn't have great luck with food sometimes (as seen in her cautionary tale), hence she hasn't gotten an Instant Pot. More on the Instant Pot here.
  • Wanna get all science-y about balsamic vinegar? Check out this, this, or this article.
  • This is what the Traditional Balsamic Vinegars look like: this 12-year Modena,  a 25-year Modena, and 12-year Emilio Reggio. Check out the shape of the bottles!
  • Here's a IGP that you can look at. 
  • You can also get some good Traditional Balsamic Vinegars at Caputo's.
  • One of our listener mails talked about using infused balsamic vinegars and oils. You can make your own (listen to this episode with Jason Logsdon), or you can buy them from a few places.  Try them on dessert, like this one that Winter loves.
  • Our Food Fight question asked about kitchen fails. It's okay--power through and if you need to, order out, just like Chris Kimball and everyone else does on occasion! Save the neck for me, Clark!
  • Have you followed us on Instagram yet? If you haven't, subscribe! We're having fun--so see you there!

Run Time: 45 minutes

Sponsors: We have no sponsors for this episode. If you're interested in working with us, please contact us. We'd love to partner with you.


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