Episode 102: Salt with Darryl Bosshardt of Redmond Inc, Part 1

Monday, July 16, 2018
We are delighted to have Daryl Bosshardt of Redmond Inc on today's Part 1 episode. He tells us about the background of salt, the history and science behind salt, and how the sea bed of salt was discovered in Redmond, Utah and how Real Salt came to be. We shout-out a listener whose wife loves cast iron, chat about Pourfect measuring cups, and get excited about cheese mayo.

Let's taco 'bout it!


Photo courtesy of Autri Taheri

Disclosure: Some of the links within these show notes are affiliate links, which means that if you choose to make a purchase, we will earn a commission, which helps support our show. This commission comes at no additional cost to you, our wonderful listener!

Let's taco 'bout it!

  • Food Nerd Shoutout: Thanks to @yeathatputnam58 for sharing a story about your wife's cast iron collecting, especially the Krusty Korn Kob Wagner Sidney, during our cast iron giveaway with Dutch Oven Daddy last week.

Krusty Korn Kob Wagner pan
  • Let's Dig Into the Kitchen Drawer: Winter loves this gift, the 9-piece Pourfect measuring cups, that she received from a friend years ago. The 1 1/2 cup and 2 cup measures are easily the best thing when she's baking. Winter's ranking: 5 out of 5 stars.
  • Welcome to Darryl Bosshardt from Redmond to talk about salt and especially, Real Salt.

Darryl Bosshardt of Redmond

  • The book Salt: A World History tells about how salt, or sodium chloride, is essential for life and how it was used to pay a salary in Roman times.
  • What are the differences between the salt we consume? Back in the day, we used salt a lot to preserve our food and we consumed a lot more salt even per our earlier episode on Canning.
  • A lot of magnesium can be pulled off the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium chloride and sodium chloride are generally pulled off to use for other purposes, then a chemical is added to the leftover sodium chloride to repel moisture (to prevent it from being hygroscopic), which creates a different type of salt from what we once had.
  • Harvesting salt from the ocean or salty bodies of water entails pulling off the water and letting it evaporate till it reaches about 26% where it will precipitate out.
  • Winter went to a salt tasting with caterer and businesswoman Mary Crafts of Culinary Crafts and it was a huge difference between our usual table salt versus Himalayan Salt and Real Salt.
  • There are ancient sea beds found in Pakistan, Bolivia, and Utah.

Photo courtesy of Monika Grabkowska

  • Darryl tells us how the salt bed that is found in Redmond, Utah was discovered.
  • He would easily choose the clay over the salt if he had to choose between the two, because the clay is harder to come by. 
  • Horses aren't made to live in a stall or paddock. Per Mike in the equine division at Redmond, salt and clay will save horses' lives everyday. Rein Water (a salt and clay mixture) is added to water for horses.
  • Join us next week for Part 2 of our interview with Darryl!
  • Introducing Interesting Ingredients: By the way, we didn't do a video for sunchokes because they're not in season right now. Anyway, Sharon talks about Cheese Mayonnaise, which she heard from our friend Anna-Marie from Beauty and the Beets. We're going to give it a try this week! Watch out for it on the Hungry Squared Podcast Facebook page. Have you liked our page?

Run Time: 47 minutes

Sponsors: We have no sponsors for this episode. If you're interested in working with us, please contact us. We'd love to partner with you.

Episode 101: What Walt Disney Ate and Disneyland Food History with Sean, Bryan, and Cooper from the Word on the Main Street Podcast

Monday, July 9, 2018
Welcome to our new format and to the guys from the Word on the Main Street Podcast on this week's episode. We chat with Sean, Bryan and Cooper all about what Walt Disney ate in the early days before and after Disneyland opened, cool Disneyland food history, and some insider tips if you're headed to Disneyland. These guys are our Disneyland experts, so we're excited to have them on for an extended podcast episode!

Let's taco 'bout it!



Disclosure: Some of the links within these show notes are affiliate links, which means that if you choose to make a purchase, we will earn a commission. This commission comes at no additional cost to you, our wonderful listener!

Let's taco 'bout it!

  • Welcome to our new format!
  • First change up: Food Nerd Shoutouts! Shoutout from a couple of listeners, Yandary and Amy, from Facebook who said the Cast Iron episode with Ned Adams (episode 99) was "life changing". If you want to comment via email hungrsquared@gmail.com or you can send us stuff to Hungry Squared Podcast, PO Box 651652, Salt Lake City, UT 84165
  • Next change: Let's Dig Into the Kitchen Drawer! This is our chance to review kitchen tools, appliances, cookbooks, etc and give our two cents on what we like or hate about it. First up on the docket, Sharon talks about the humble 2 quart batter bowl by Anchor Hocking. Pros: Works as a measuring cup with spout, has a cover, fits in the microwave. Cons: Some of the smaller ones (the 4-cup) may not have a lid. Sharon gives the batter bowl a 4 stars.

Anchor Hocking 2 qt. batter bowl
  • Listen to the episode where we were guests on Word on the Main Street Podcast (WOTMS Episode 65) where we talked all about the food on the new Pixar Pier. So fun (and funny)!
  • Thanks to Sean Lords, Bryan Lords, and Cooper Trimble of the Word on the Main Street Podcast for joining us on the podcast this week!


  • Walt Disney ate a lot of "poor man's food" to save money. He loved pancakes, hash, spam, chili, etc. He likes to eat cheap.
  • Walt ate at the Plaza Inn all the time, especially the fried chicken.
  • Walt's favorite cookies was the Chinese Candy Cookies--chow mien noodles and butterscotch chips.
  • We reference the book Eat Like Walt: The Wonderful World of Disney Food by Marcy Smothers.

Eat Like Walt by Marcy Smothers
  • Mickey-shaped foods are a brilliant design and branding: Ice cream, beignets, ice cream sandwich, sour-dough bread, sundaes, etc. 
  • Adventure Land was originally based on the True Life Adventures with the Tiki Room, Tahitian Lounge, and serious Jungle Cruise.
  • Dole Whip: The Tiki Room was originally presented by Dole. Disney couldn't afford to do all these rides in the beginning, so they had many sponsors in the beginning.
  • There used to be pancake races in conjunction with the Aunt Jemimah Pancake House. 
  • What is the "grey stuff" at the Red Rose Tavern? Cookies and cream mousse, inside red velvet cake, on a shortbread cookie, with red and white edible pearls.
  • There is a food guide map for Pixar Pier, which is divided out by movie. You can download it here.
  • Disney merchandizes all of these movies in their food. Cooper talks about the Coco cup and it was sold out from the first week they sold them.
  • Fancy and collectable Disney popcorn containers are huge.

  • Carnation Cafe was sponsored by the Carnation Company. According to the WOTMS guys, they have the best eggs Benedict. There was a chef, Oscar, who started in 1956 and just retired in 2017.
  • Do a character breakfast or meal a
  • You can book with Getaway Today. You can get $10.00 off if you book with them and mention the code "mainstreet10".
  • Disney Japan: The churros there were in the shape of Mickey. You can listen to the couple of WOTMS episodes here and here specifically on Sean's visit to Disney Japan.
  • There are Disney Secret Menu Items: You can get your burger "alien style" at Galactic Grill, Neapolitan Shake at Flo's V8 Cafe, Mac and Cheese bread bowl at the Pacific Wharf Cafe, Hidden Burrito at the Rancho del Zocalo, and Frito Pie at Coke Corner.
  • Did you hear that WOTMS's Bryan's Trivia Question: What is Walt Disney's favorite type of dessert? The answer is pie and the 3 types were 1) apple pie, 2) boysenberry pie, and 3) frozen lemon chiffon pie. Did you enter?

Photo courtesy of Annie Pratt




Run Time: 1 hour 17 minutes (extended episode!)

Sponsors: We have no sponsors for this episode. If you're interested in working with us, please contact us. We'd love to partner with you.

Hungry Squared Podcast Listener Survey: Win a Sous Vide Precision Cooker Circulator!

Monday, July 2, 2018
Who wants to win a sous vide precision cooker circulator, so you can make the best steaks ever? Here is the link:


To enter the contest, complete the Hungry Squared Listener Survey by Monday, July 16, 2018 at 11:59 PM MST

Thanks, food nerdy friends!


Episode 100: A Look Back on 100 Episodes of the Hungry Squared Podcast and GIveaways!

It's our 100th Hungry Squared Podcast episode! We are here with Ike and Lee to look back on the last couple of years, talk about about our favorite moments and episodes, and announce some awesome giveaways because we want to say thanks and that we love you guys!

Let's taco 'bout it!



Disclosure: Some of the links within these show notes are affiliate links, which means that if you choose to make a purchase, we will earn a commission, which helps support our show. This commission comes at no additional cost to you, our wonderful listener!

Let's taco 'bout it!

  • It's our 100th episode! And we're excited to have Ike and Lee on the podcast today to celebrate with us.
  • Sharon had a dango, rice balls with a sweet soy sauce glaze, with the guys from Word on the Main Street when we recorded an episode with them. Go enter their trivia contest!
  • Lee talked about the homemade pasta with our Italian friends from Ti Amo Wood-Fired Pizza.
  • Ike went to Sugarhouse Barbeque with brisket and smoked chicken wings and loved it.
  • Winter talked about a "salad" that she had this week at a friend's potluck. One guy took Lee's definition of a salad (i.e. anything that fits in a bowl and if there are tongs with it) and ran with it and made a meat salad with Sweet Baby Ray's BBQ Sauce.
  • Sharon and I started the podcast because we liked the Joy the Baker Podcast with Joy the Baker and Tracy from Shutterbean, we liked food, and we needed to do something so we could hang out after Lucy was born.







🎈🎈🎈GIVEAWAY for our 100th Hungry Squared Podcast Episode🎈🎈🎈 . As way of celebrating our 100th episode and to win a Global chef's knife, steel, and Epicurean cutting board πŸ”ͺπŸ”ͺπŸ”ͺ, here's how to enter our Instagram contest: . 1) Follow @hungrysquared on Instagram, 2) Comment on a nerdy food topic you'd like us to cover, AND 3) Tag a friend who has (or wishes they had) ninja-like knife skills! πŸ”ͺπŸ”ͺπŸ”ͺπŸ‘¨‍πŸ³πŸ‘©‍🍳 (Each person you tag is an additional entry!) Contest closes Monday, July 9, 2018 @11:59 PM MST. 🎈🎈🎈 . Listen to our 100th episode here: http://www.hungrysquared.com/2018/07/ep100-look-back-100-hungry-squared-giveaways.html?m=1 . . . #knifeskills #iggiveaway #globalknife #igvideo #foodpodcast #chopping #foodexpert #foodscience #globalknives #cucumber #cucumbers #100episodes #podcast #podcasts #foodnerd #homecook #fooddesign #foodhistory #knifeskill #epicureancuttingboard #cookingathome #seriouseats # πŸ”ͺ #chefmode #vegetable #vegetables #foodiechats #giveaway #fastchopper #ilovefood @globalcutleryusa @epicurean_usa @godmotherx5
A post shared by Sharon Titus & Winter Redd (@hungrysquared) on

  • 100th Episode Hungry Squared Facebook Contest: You can win a Thermapen MK4 thermometer if you like our Facebook page and comment on the post. Closes at July 9, 2018 at 11:59 pm MST.


  • 100th Episode Newsletter Contest: You can win an Instant Pot if you sign up for our newsletter on our website. Closes at July 9, 2018 at 11:59 pm MST.


  • We love you guys! Thanks for joining us on this journey!

Run Time: 34 minutes

Sponsors: We have no sponsors for this episode. If you're interested in working with us, please contact us. We'd love to partner with you.

Episode 99: Cast Iron History, Seasoning, and Restoration with Ned Adams of Dutch Oven Daddy

Saturday, June 30, 2018
On this week's extended episode, we interview Ned Adams of Dutch Oven Daddy and he gives us all the details of cast iron in America from Griswold, Wagner Ware, and Lodge. He then gets practical and we talk about how to season a piece of cast iron and what to do when the cast iron looks old, gunky, and rusted. Plus, we're having a giveaway on the Hungry Squared Instagram for a Lodge 10" cast iron skillet. Plus, we talk about how not to get hot, but stay fed during summer on our Food Fight segment.

Let's taco 'bout it!



Disclosure: Some of the links within these show notes are affiliate links, which means that if you choose to make a purchase, we will earn a commission, which helps support our show. This commission comes at no additional cost to you, our wonderful listener!

Let's taco 'bout it!



  • Ned got into cast iron when his mother-in-law gave him a cast iron skillet and decided to cook her a meal each week when she broke her leg overseas.
  • He got a factory tour of Lodge at their 3rd Street Foundry. Lodge takes several types of iron, melts it down, pour it into molds, cleans off the pieces, then pre-seasons the cast iron, boxes the cookware up and ships it out.
  • How does the polishing happen? Most manufacturers don't polish the cast iron anymore, because it can be quite expensive. It was previously done by hand, which is time-intensive.
  • The molds are made of two sand molds.
  • Lodge cast iron is made of 3 ingredients: pig iron (iron found in natural environments), old cast-off cast iron pieces, and scrap steel.
  • The older brands are Griswold, Wagner Ware, Birmingham Stove and Range (BSR), CHF (Chicago Hardware Foundry).
  • Griswold's logo usually involves a cross and the word Griswold is stamped on the bottom of the pan.


  • Gate marks are from pieces the pre-1900s. It was made when the pan was being pinched off from the mold.


  • WagnerWare has a lovely script with a shared W in the logo.


  • Camp ovens generally have 3 legs on the bottom and lip on the lid (invented by Paul Revere, a metal worker) to hold the charcoal. Self-basting lids on the camp ovens have bumps on the inside.
  • How does cast iron seasoning work and how do you do it? We've talked about it before on a previous episode here, but Ned gets into seasoning and how he does it. He says you can use whatever oil, just as long as you get it to the right temperature for the oil used. Per Ned, anytime your food sticks, you need to season your pan more. Ned goes 3 to 5 layers of seasoning. Cast iron before seasoning is not black, it's gray. 
  • How much oil are you using? You don't need very much oil--a very thin layer--on the inside and outside also. Rub it all over the pan, then take a rag and wipe it down so it doesn't look shiny.
  • By the way, Ned and friends started a new endeavor making their own seasoning called BuzzyWaxx. Check it out here!


  • Temperature and time: Go over the oil's smoke point for about an 1 hour. After the last seasoning, don't add additional oil for storage.
  • How do you clean your cast iron: You can use soap and water. The soap will not strip the polymerization layer unless it has lye in it (i.e. sodium hydroxide...Winter misspoke and said aluminum hydroxide--sheesh!)
  • Restoration methods: Spray some Easy-Off (yellow cap has the lye) and use a electrolysis tank. 
  • You can make your own electrolysis tank (or E-Tank) per Ned's website. Or you can do a 50% vinegar and 50% water to remove any rust if you don't want to make an electrolysis tank.


  • What is the leftover carbon on an old piece of cast-iron? It's baked-on food! Decades of food! Gross! You might have to use a spoon to scrape that stuff off after it being electrolysis tank or the vinegar/water mixture.
  • Griswold chicken fryer was quite cool to see. It's also called a combo cooker or double dutch oven.
  • Ned's collecting a 3-notch Lodge set from the 50s. They are numbered to 3-14 (no 11 or 13 in this set). 
  • Joseph Lodge started out in South Pittsburg, Tennessee with the company Blacklock (pre-Lodge), but it burned down. When they built a new one, they named the new company after the family name. They also made other things besides cookware--little dogs, irons, garden gnomes--to survive during lean times.


  • You can damage your cast iron: Do not throw your cast iron into the fire to restore.
  • Pitting: Old stoves would put out sulphur and would cause pitting in the cast iron.
  • You don't have to worry about acidic food if the seasoning has been done properly.
  • Warping and cracking happens when there are extremes of temperatures. If you're cleaning a piece of hot or warm piece of cast iron, make sure to wash it with hot water.
  • You can find Ned at his website Dutch Oven Daddy, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook. Also, join their Cast Iron Community.
  • We're doing a giveaway for a 10" Lodge Skillet on Dutch Oven Daddy's and Hungry Squared's Instagram. Woot woot!


  • During our Food Fight segment, we chat about how to keep the house cool even though you need to feed your family. Lee usually makes salads (with more stuff than lettuce) or sandwiches. We often use our Instant Pot or sous vide machine to keep the temperature down. Go to the grocery store to create a snack meal (aka charcuterie board). Or BBQ outside!

Run Time: 1 hour 13 minutes

Sponsors: We have no sponsors for this episode. If you're interested in working with us, please contact us. We'd love to partner with you.

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